Auschwitz

Full Lotus

Hob Nob King
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littlefish said:
why is everyone talking about this? ? ?

please ask yourselves this question also

So we don't forget and teach others that don't know.


Btw, Joseph Kennedy(JFK and RFK's father), was a Nazi sympathizer, who had designs on the Whitehouse. Good job he didn't get in, or I think the outcome of World War II would have been quite different.
 

JPsychodelicacy

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full_lotus said:
Btw, Joseph Kennedy(JFK and RFK's father), was a Nazi sympathizer, who had designs on the Whitehouse. Good job he didn't get in, or I think the outcome of World War II would have been quite different.
There were a disturbing number of Nazi symaphisers in the echelons of power in many 'Western' countries.

Prescott Bush (Dubya's grandfather) actually traded with the Nazis, right up until the early '40s.

J.
 

SkizZ

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grokit23 said:
We talked about helping the poles and then did bugger all, when it came down to it, the German invasion was over and done with while we were still saying bad Mr Hitler.

Ok, we did drop supplies for a while to try and relieve the situation in the siege of Warsaw, but we effectively did nowt. A declaration of war, followed by sitting there telling them off and waiting wasn't much help.

My original point still stands IMO, we weren't that far off taking a similar route...
Britain was not in a realistic position to come to anyones aid militarily - had the germans invaded us at that point - we'd probably have lost! plus the french and the russians were also part of the treaty defending Poland - the Russians threw it out of the window letting the Germans through for their own gains and well we all know what happened to the French - the germans just avoided the Maginot line and took over...

Yeah there was right wing and left wing sentiment all over europe and we had sympathisers in the UK both politically and royally - but lets not forget the general sentiment of the people - hundreds of thousands of british people died fighting fascism and for some reason you guys just seem to want to focus on a tiny minority.
 

lala69

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I wonder what it is about human nature that causes us to be so destructive? I know that there are many causative factors that could be found for the tragedies that befall us... the fact is that they do - with alarming regularity. Why is that? Ok... I'm going to stop my sermonising now... :runsmile:
 

TranceVisuals

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For me the lessons of this tradegy is that we must think for ourselves and not
follow the orders given to us in trust. We must question authority, and go along with
conscience of our decisions. What distresses me so much about war is an old addage
that is only making sense when I see loads of fresh faced 18-19 yr old americans in
Iraq. War is made by old men at home, and fought by young men on the front.
So long as we have a situation whereby those who potentially benefit the most are
removed from the results of their actions we will continue to see the blatant disregard
for human life, that runs into the megadeaths every single year.
It isn't the shock that we are capable of these things, it is the fact that we allow tacitly
these things to go on in the first place. So habituated are we by social rule and custom,
and many of the tales of holocust bare witness to this, that we are driven by a sense
of paralysis and guilt, to excerise our ability to say never again, whether by violence, ignorance, chemicals or the atomic bomb.

First they came for the trade unions, and radical leftwing, and I did nothing. Then they came for the anarchists and muslims and I did nothing...... Then they came for.....
 

Sturdy Pete

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yodhe said:
For me the lessons of this tradegy is that we must think for ourselves and not follow the orders given to us in trust. We must question authority, and go along with conscience of our decisions. What distresses me so much about war is an old addage that is only making sense when I see loads of fresh faced 18-19 yr old americans in
Iraq. War is made by old men at home, and fought by young men on the front.
So long as we have a situation whereby those who potentially benefit the most are removed from the results of their actions we will continue to see the blatant disregard for human life, that runs into the megadeaths every single year.
It isn't the shock that we are capable of these things, it is the fact that we allow tacitly these things to go on in the first place. So habituated are we by social rule and custom, and many of the tales of holocust bare witness to this, that we are driven by a sense of paralysis and guilt, to excerise our ability to say never again, whether by violence, ignorance, chemicals or the atomic bomb.
well said. the people who make the decisions rarely have experience of the reality - they only have reports to read in their comfy offices, maybe see a few "disturbing" images on the TV. put them on the front line and they'd soon change their tune..
 

sickrabbit

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i walked around Auschwitz about 6 years ago with my father in law who was forced into hard labour as a young boy in siberia ..i,ll never know what really happened to him there as he sadly died , he was a wonderful man a real gentleman and i was astonished of his bravery walking around this horrid death camp - it must have brought back some awful memories.....

Auschwitz , is a somber experience , that is a reminder of evil in its purist form , it should never be forgotten.
I feel cold when ever i watch , talk or even pick up the book i brought in the camps museum gift shop.
A place of terror and an overbiding sense of fear that will not leave you......
 
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