Brazil Creates New Forest Reserves

trancetheory

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Some (relatively) good news from the Amazon rainforest - pass it on :Smile3: x

VICTORY!
***********************************************
FOREST CONSERVATION NEWS TODAY
Brazil Creates Massive New Amazonian Forest Reserves
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Forests.org a project of Ecological Internet, Inc.

http://forests.org/ -- Forest Conservation Portal
http://www.rainforestportal.org/ -- Rainforest Portal

February 15, 2006
OVERVIEW & COMMENTARY by Dr. Glen Barry, Forests.org

Brazil has created two new national parks in the Amazon
rainforest and expanded another, placing 1.5 million hectares
(3.7 million acres) of rainforest, an area twice the size of
Belgium, completely off limits to development. President Luiz
Inacio Lula da Silva's decree seeks to preserve an
environmentally sensitive region in the western part of Pará
state long plagued by land disputes and environmental
devastation, and next to where the government plans to pave a
major road. Brazil's first four "Sustainable Forest Districts"
or national forests for "sustainable logging" were also created.

In total some 6.4 million hectares west of the as of yet unpaved
BR-163 highway were granted some form of protection. The
protected areas seek to ensure that the planned paving of
highway BR-163 does not result in an uncontrolled increase of
logging on lands bordering the road, as has historically
occurred throughout Amazonia. The controversial highway,
stretching from the midwestern city of Cuiaba to the jungle port
of Santarem, cuts through the heart of the rainforest and
threatens to open a swath of destruction across the world's
largest remaining tropical wilderness. Typically each road cut
into the rainforest causes destruction for 30 miles on each side
within a few years as invaders arrive to cut trees.

Forests.org has been instrumental in this victory, through years
of raising awareness internationally regarding the potential
impacts of road and other infrastructure development in the
Amazon. Our international network has repeatedly asked the
Brazilian government to increase protected areas in the Amazon,
and to develop policies to mitigate deforestation. We have
generated hundreds of thousands of protest emails that are a
small but important part of these successful Amazon rainforest
protections.

It remains to be seen whether protections of the type announced
can halt follow on deforestation associated with roads in
ancient forests, and just how ecologically sustainable forestry
in ancient primary forests can be. Nonetheless, congratulations
to Forests.org network members that participated in our years of
campaigning, to the many others that work on these topics, and
may Dorothy Stang who gave her life for these protections rest
in peace.
g.b.

MAKE COMMENTS:
http://www.rainforestportal.org/issues/2006/02/victory_brazil_creates_massiv
e.asp

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RELAYED TEXT STARTS HERE:

ITEM #1
Title: Brazil's President Creates New Forest Reserves in Amazon
Source: Copyright 2006, Associated Press
Date: February 15, 2006

Brazil has created two new national parks in the Amazon rain
forest and expanded another to preserve an environmentally
sensitive region next to where the government plans to pave a
major road. The protected area is roughly twice the size of
Belgium.

President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva signed a decree placing 1.5
million hectares (3.7 million acres) of rain forest completely
off limits for development, in a surprise ceremony late Monday.

"This is very important and should be celebrated," said
Environment Minister Marina Silva, who is not related to the
president.

President Silva also created four national forests where
sustainable logging will be permitted and an environmental
protection zone where development is allowed under strict
regulation.

In total, the decree granted some form of environmental
protection to 6.4 million hectares (16 million acres) on the
western side of the so-far unpaved BR-163 highway.

The controversial highway, stretching from the midwestern city
of Cuiaba to the jungle port of Santarem, cuts through the heart
of the rain forest and environmentalists warn that paving it
will open a swath of destruction across the world's largest
remaining tropical wilderness.

The protected land lies in an area where President Silva
declared a logging moratorium after the killing last year of
American nun and environmental defender Dorothy Stang.

Stang, who spent the last 23 years of her life defending poor
communities against the loggers and land grabbers who abound in
the Amazon, was killed in a land dispute with a local rancher on
Feb. 12, 2005.

Her killing sparked an international uproar, and within days the
government declared the creation of two massive national parks
and two extractivist reserves -- areas where people can live as
long as they don't damage the forest -- along with the logging
moratorium along the BR-163.

Two gunmen have been convicted for Stang's killing and two
ranchers are awaiting trial on charges of ordering her death.

On Tuesday, David Stang, the brother of the slain nun, praised
the new forest as "a great victory. Dorothy is still having an
enormous influence in Brazil," Stang said from his home near
Colorado Springs, Colo.

Environmentalists offered more measured praise.

"The moratorium proved to be effective because it gave the state
power to act against those who thought they could illegally
seize public lands," said Claudio Maretti, coordinator of
protected areas for the World Wide Fund for Nature in Brazil.
"But the government should be quicker to declare protected areas
in other regions."

The moratorium was decreed to give the government time to decide
how to zone the area along the BR-163 highway before paving
would begin.

Soy farmers, who have been expanding rapidly into the Amazon in
recent years, want the highway paved as a way to speed their
shipments abroad.

Environmentalists, however, estimate that each road cut into the
rain forest causes destruction for 30 miles on each side within
a few years as invaders arrive to cut trees.

"At least these areas were created. The next step is
implementation," said Paulo Adario, director of Greenpeace's
Amazon campaign. "If they are going to start paving without
implementing the reserves we are going to lose everything."

Monday's decree brings the total area in the Amazon under some
form of federal protection to 45.8 million hectares (113 million
acres), the environment ministry said.

The Brazilian Amazon sprawls over 4.1 million square kilometers
(1.6 million square miles), the size of western Europe. Experts
say as much as 20 percent of the forest has been destroyed by
development, logging and farming. Last year the forest lost a
near-record 26,130 square kilometers (10,000 square miles).


ITEM #2
Title: Brazil Expands Amazon National Park, Creates Forest
Reserves
Source: Copyright 2006, Environment News Service
Date: February 15, 2006

BRASILIA, Brazil, February 15, 2006 (ENS) - Brazilian President
Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva on Monday signed decrees expanding
Amazon National Park and creating seven new environmental
protected areas in the western part of Pará state, a region
marked by land disputes and environmental devastation.

The protected areas are intended to ensure that the planned
paving of highway BR-163 does not result in uncontrolled
increase of logging on lands bordering the road, as has
historically occurred throughout Amazonia.

In one decree, President Lula added 150,000 hectares to the
million hectare (2.47 million acre) Amazon National Park, and
another establishes the country's first Sustainable Forest
District, also located in western Pará and aimed at fostering
sustainable development in the region.

These decrees bring the total protected area in that region of
Pará to 6.4 million hectares (15.8 million acres).

The Amazon region as a whole now has 45.8 million hectares (113
million acres) of protected area, an increase of one-third as
compared to 2003.

"The Lula administration's Plan to Combat Deforestation added 50
percent to this total by including another 15.1 million hectares
of Conservation Units," said Environment Minister Marina Silva,
who is not related to the president.

Following a meeting with President Lula and representatives of
nongovernmental organizations, the environment minister said the
district will be capable of generating 100,000 jobs, producing
around 400 megawatts of electricity, and collecting US$832.52
million in taxes each year.

"These figures make a difference for the future of sustainable
development in the Amazon region," Minister Silva said.

According to the President's Chief of Staff Dilma Rousseff, who
also attended the meeting, these are just some of the steps the
government plans to announce this year to combat deforestation
and reduce rural conflict in the country.

"All these steps are very important, because they constitute an
institutional framework that will allow the country to control
deforestation and lay the foundations for sustainable
development," Rousseff said.

In her view, the battle against deforestation has been one of
the priorities of the current administration, which has been
developing activities in this area since 2003.

Cláudio Maretti, coordinator of the Protected Areas Program of
WWF-Brazil, said the creation of protected areas is effective in
keeping land grabbers from illegally assuming ownership of
public lands and destroying the forests, accomplishing de facto
development.

"However," said Maretti, "the government must be faster in
decreeing protected areas in other regions in case the pressures
to abandon conservation intensify."

Maretti pointed out that there is a delay of one year before
land protected by decree actually becomes a new conservation
unit.

The newly protected lands are located along the BR-163 in the
area where President Lula declared a logging moratorium after
the murder of American nun Sister Dorothy Stang in February
2005. Stang spent more than 20 years in Brazil as an
environmental activist involved in the fight for land rights in
the Amazon River basin.

Two gunmen have been convicted of Stang's murder. Clodoaldo
Batista was sentenced to 17 years in jail and Rayfran das Neves
was sentenced to 28 years in jail.

Another three men accused of ordering her killing are in prison
and are scheduled to be tried in April.


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trancetheory

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itz a start tho, espcially considering the way the Brazlian government has been easily manipulate by the logging companiez & soya growers out there :iyes:

kool, will chek the other link :Grin:
 

dreadnaut

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What a load of bollocks! :imad: Most soya goes into prepackaged ready meals.

No self-respecting hippy eats rainforest grown soya, or rainforest grown beef for that matter. Ever heard of vegetables? :irazz:
 

dreadnaut

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sorry, it read like you were either misinformed or making a troll comment to me.
 

trancetheory

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bloody chav *glares @ zero-G* hehe :irazz:

Is there some kind of labeling system for Soya products to declare that it has been grown from a good source? Brazil is the largest exporter of the stuff anywhere in the world...
 

dreadnaut

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No labeling system as far as I'm aware. The main concern at the moment seems to be whether it's GM soya or not.

Best bet to avoid rainforest soya is to go for small independent ethical suppliers, and do your research. Phone them up / email them and ask them where they get their soya from. If they don't know or won't say, then avoid!
 

dreadnaut

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Here's more good news from Rainforest Portal... plus the work that still needs to be done

VICTORY
***********************************************
FOREST CONSERVATION NEWS TODAY
Brazil Expands Amazon Protection, Calls upon Rich World to Do More
for Environment
***********************************************
Rainforest Portal a project of Ecological Internet, Inc.
http://www.rainforestportal.org/ -- Rainforest Portal
http://www.rainforestportal.org/news/ -- Rainforest Newsfeed

March 28, 2006
OVERVIEW & COMMENTARY by Dr. Glen Barry, Rainforest Portal

Brazil's President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva has announced massive
new protections for the Amazon on the eve of a United Nations
biodiversity meeting starting in Brazil. The Brazilian government
has announced that 84,000 square miles of the Amazon rain forest -
an area about the size of Kansas - will be declared a protected
zone over the next three years. Let us hope this is preservation
in an intact state, and not illusory "sustainable" logging.

President da Silva took the opportunity to challenge the rich,
over-developed world to expand its protection of the environment.
The Brazilian leader rightly blamed industrialized nations for the
"unsustainable patterns of production and consumption... It is
unacceptable that poorer nations continue to suffer the main
burden of environmental degradation".

Ecological Internet's network has been instrumental in
successfully advocating for the Brazilian government to increase
Amazon rainforest protections. Similarly we will persevere and
succeed in uniting the rainforest conservation movement behind the
goal of ending ancient forest logging once and for all - shunning
and shaming those environmental miscreants that promote industrial
forestry in primary and old-growth forests as being desirable.

Illustrating their conflicted campaign strategy, Greenpeace
released maps at the biodiversity conference showing that only 10%
of the world's forests remain in an intact condition. Yet
Greenpeace supports and advocates for industrial forest logging
from Canada to Brazil. Given only 10% of the world's natural
forest heritage remains, perhaps Greenpeace and friends can
explain why they continue to support industrial forestry
(certified and otherwise) in these last ancient primary and old-
growth forests?

Greenpeace's forestry campaign needs to get its act together and
end its megalomaniacal and schizophrenic ways. You can not both
industrially log and protect/preserve ancient rainforests. It is
unconscionable that organizations viewed as rainforest protectors
have become rainforest logging apologists.

Getting Greenpeace, WWF, Rainforest Action Network and the World
Bank out of the ancient forest logging support business must
become a major focus of the rainforest movement. Only after their
appeasement has ended, and we unite behind a call to end ancient
forest logging, will the world's rainforests have a chance for
survival.
g.b.

To Comment on this Article:
http://www.rainforestportal.org/issues/2006/03/victory_brazil_anno
unces_massi.asp
*******************************

RELAYED TEXT STARTS HERE:

Title: Brazil Expands Amazon Protection as Global Environmental
Conference Starts
Source: Copyright 2006, Associated Press
Date: March 28, 2006
Byline: Michael Astor

Brazil announced plans to expand protection of the Amazon rain
forest, and its president on Monday called on wealthy nations to
do more to protect the environment.

President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva blamed industrialized nations
for the "unsustainable patterns of production and consumption."

"It is unacceptable that poorer nations continue to suffer the
main burden of environmental degradation," the Brazilian leader
told cabinet ministers from more than 90 countries. His remarks
came at the opening of three days of high-level talks at the
eighth biannual Conference of Parties to the Convention
on Biodiversity, sponsored by the United Nations.

The talks are a major test to the cabinet ministers' commitment to
the 1992 treaty; and a U.N. report released at the conference said
species were being lost at the fastest rate since the
disappearance of dinosaurs -- or as much as 1,000 times faster
than the natural rate of extinction.

"In a sense we are at a crossroads," said Marcelo Furtado of the
environmental group Greenpeace.

Furtado said without tangible results from the conference,
"pressing environmental issues could end up being dealt with at
other forums like the World Trade Organization, where economic
considerations take greater priority."

The Convention on Biological Diversity arose from the 1992 Earth
Summit in Rio de Janeiro, where more than 100 world leaders
recognized that the world's environment was in danger and pledged
to take steps to protect it.

The 11-day convention in Curitiba -- 400 miles southwest of Rio de
Janeiro -- runs through Friday and is aimed at reviewing progress
made toward goals set out at the Earth Summit.

Brazil's Environmental Ministry said late Sunday that 84,000
square miles of the Amazon rain forest -- an area about the size
of Kansas -- would be declared a protected zone over the next
three years.

The campaign is part of the Amazon Protected Areas Program, which
banned development in some regions and created sustainable
development zones in others.

The world's largest remaining wilderness, the Amazon region covers
nearly half of Brazil and extends into five neighboring countries.

Greenpeace released maps last weeks showing that less than 10
percent of the world's forests remained intact, and
environmentalists said governments worldwide have failed to honor
their commitments to the Global Fund for the Environment, another
product of the Earth Summit, leaving the fund with only $10
billion -- or $67 billion less than promised.
 
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