Samples & key manipulation

Heaven and Earth

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After lurking for a while I thought I'd ask you guys a question that's been bamboozling me for a while.

I'm trying to produce a track in the key of G and I've been given a few samples to play with. Is it possible for me to convert the keys of the samples into something useable? (They're in A, A# & D mostly)

I know how to manipulate the diferent BPMs through timestretching / beatslicing in Intakt or ReCycle, but this pitch thing has me foxed.

Cheers :badger:
 

RedZebra

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what software are you using? cubase (and prolly most others) has "pitchshift" built in so you can easily pitch your samples up or down a few notes. Beyond that you'll probably start getting artefacts (more or less so depending on what algorithm you choose). If you're trying to shift synth melodies a lot your probably better off generating them yourself on a synth rather than sampling and pitchshifting. there are some good vst pitchshifter also, such as Waves pitchshifter.
 

Heaven and Earth

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Thanks for the reply :Smile3:

I'm using Cubase SX 3, with the NI suite of goodies, and I'm trying to pitch Indian vocal samples :Smile3:

I have already tried loading a sample into Kontakt and mapped it over an octave, but it sounded horible at any more than a couple of notes away from the root. Also, the speed was increased, I guess to compensate, which then would afect the BPM.

I thought I might need to firstly correct the pitch, then time-stretch to get the right BPM. What do you think?
 
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makdaddy

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Ableton live will re-pitch stuff with no difference in the length of the sample.

dunno how mutch use that is to you tho being an SX user :Smile3:

good luck!
 

JPsychodelicacy

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Word of warning though, always make sure you're working on a copy of the sample file rather than the original.

J.
 

Faction

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If you need to do more to the sample than just re-pitch it (for example to convert between minor and major keys), you might want to consider snipping out the offending sections (after applying whatever global pitch-shift is necessary to get it in the right general key) and shifting it separately by an additional semitone up or down as appropriate.

Samples in D have a good chance of working (if differently) in G without needing much work.
 

Heaven and Earth

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theyellowbrickroad said:
if you right click the sample, (in cubase) go to 'process' then 'pitch shift'

you can choose your desired note you want it to be and click the button 'time correction'

hey presto you have a new sample of a new pitch keeping the right length!

Hope this helps
Many thanks - this did the trick :drinking:

And I take on board the other great comment about not editing my original sample :Smile3:
 
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